Guest Blog: How to Pivot Your Business During #COVID19 Like KFC Jamaica

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Photo Credit: @kfcjamaica

Industry: Fast Food | Company: Restaurants of Jamaica

Managed Brands: KFC, Pizza Hut |Years In Operation Locally: 45 Years

When the first confirmed COVID19 case hit Jamaica, on March 10, like many businesses,  Restaurant of Jamaica, owners and operators of KFC scoped the landscape and saw how to best to pivot given the unprecedented times to make ‘painful decisions’.

A week later, on the heels of the Government shutdown which brought the limited operation with a 12 hour curfew, the once high trafficked and high volume stores saw sales plummet by 50%; fewer persons were eating out given the restricted public gathering to 20 persons and out of fear and uncertainty of coming out into public places. According to Director of Marketing Tina Matalon who noted in a July Zoom session, “our biggest challenge was accessibility; we’ve been looking at the delivery channel for a couple of years, the right model and approach to enter it with a brand like KFC; we accelerated that, rapidly”

This spawned two news releases in April:

·       The brand added a delivery option.

·       The brand announced temporary layoff of staff.

Social Media Backlash

Once social media got wind of the layoffs, the brand came under severe backlash online.

Thousands of Jamaicans online begged for their fellow Jamaican workers who by that time would have received lower working hours and possibly been laid off. The challenge? Jamaicans saw no reason to lay off staff when the demand for the brand’s key products was still very high. Jamaica’s Largest food chain, amidst a tight curfew which brought “early closures of our restaurants during some of our most patronized times of the day the options were very slim.

According to the release ‘it has been struggling to cope with significant declines in sales and transactions of more than half of its business.” The company went on to say that it will re-engage employees as quickly as possible. adapt and find creative ways to sustain its operations in order to ensure that it can continue to support its employees for as long as possible.

Digital Shift

“The Jamaican marketplace is behind on a lot of trends that are globally successful when it comes to technology or in the digital landscape; one of the immediate opportunities we saw was opening our access channels”. As delivery partners were small in operation catering to casual dining, the infrastructure was not equipped to take on the robust nature of a high-demand, quick service fast-food model like KFC. The brand worked with partners to scale up and meet the demand quickly with an excellent package, on-time delivery and fast turn-around time.

Thankfully, amidst the flurry of COVID19 and the backlash, not only did the team “keep everyone employed and on the team which was an incredible feat”, social media sentiment  has been returned in a favorable light and  the brand accelerated business models in 3 weeks to:

✔️Adapt to the shift in consumer behavior (stay-at-home or WFH).

✔️Get the product to them (online ordering via 7Krave )

✔️Redefine customer acquisition via digitizing.

The business now has three models – walk-in, drive-up, or order in. Digital ordering and delivery will be a ‘permanent channel moving forward’.

#HowToPivot: Advice to the Caribbean Biz

·      Review your operations and spreadsheet.

·      See where you can meet customers where they are in terms of delivery.

·      Make a big deal of the new options to drive awareness, trial and uptake.Be agile in your approach, listen to feedback and follow all guidelines stipulated.    

About The Guest Blogger

Shane Bennett is the co-founder of Social Media Day Jamaica. A media and marketing strategist by profession, he focuses on digital, experiential and public relations for personal, corporate and SME brands. Find him on Twitter and on LinkedIn sharing tips for digital branding at his @iamsgb handle.

Actress and Model turned DJ Gabrielle Davis: Getting Paid to be Herself

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To launch my Creatives of the Future e-book, (you can purchase on Amazon or Gumroad) I interviewed some creatives who were already monetizing their platforms because of their work on social media. One of those people is actress and international model-turned-DJ, Gabrielle Davis.

International model Dj Gabby before COVID-19.

What do you do for a living?  I am currently juggling modeling along with balancing my new found DJ career. 

How many followers do you have? Close to 60K followers on IG.

If you could eat any type of food (right now) what would you buy?  Hmmm… if I could eat any type of food right now I would need a few options. I am a foodie… lol I would go for curry shrimp & a slice of carrot cake on the side. Dessert is a MUST …oh and I love donuts 🙂

What is your dream job? My dream job was to be a child psychologist funny enough, but I am focusing on being successful as a DJ. I would also like to still love to get into the acting business in the near future.

What Netflix series are you binging on? OZARK

Favorite Influencer/YouTuber of all time?  Not so sure if I have a fave influencer … right now I enjoy watching Quarantine radio with Torey Lanez … great for laughs and he’s so entertaining.

How has social media helped your career?  Social media has helped me connect with a variety of people in the industry and has given opportunities I probably wouldn’t have gotten without the exposure. It’s a great platform to share your talent and to connect.

What advice would you give others trying to make a name for themselves?  My advice to anyone trying to make it in whichever field they choose would be to stay consistent, persistent, be positive, don’t allow others to discourage you. There will be times you may have self-doubt but allow yourself to process it. Never give up and never stop trying. Don’t limit yourself and don’t listen to people who tell you that you can’t or that time is running out. Most importantly practice patience.

What is the last thing you liked on social media? The last thing I liked on social media was a video of someone getting their nails done … because quarantine 

Who is your hero? – My hero will always be ME. I’ve never given up on myself. Not for long anyway.

How are you monetizing at this time? – At this time I work with brands who want products showcased and that are true to my lifestyle.

What made you want to be a DJ? – I’ve always wanted to do music for the last 5 years I was just not confident enough but I finally after sharing it with my manager we came up with a plan and we are putting it into motion.

What kind of music interests you? I love music…I am interested in all genres… I can’t just choose one.

The digital space is more important than ever to elevate brand awareness and develop business relationships. Consumers are viewing content from a different perspective than just three months prior, and those that can pivot fast are effectively winning.

Gabrielle Davis otherwise known as “DJ Gabby” has been playing music for only a few months but has been making waves.

More popularly known from her appearance on the first season of VH1’s Love and Hip Hop: Miami in 2018 and her international modeling career, Gabby became verified on Instagram about a year ago and has been continuing to create interesting content for her followers, most notable with her IG live DJ sessions.

Gabrielle who started modeling at the age of 16, has never been afraid of hard work. Although she doesn’t do runway because of her height (she’s only 5ft 4″) she recently walked for costume designer Annaxie for Xamayca International’s Carnival 2020 launch. More than a pretty face, Gabby uses her acting skills appearing in music videos for everyone from Shenseea to Agent Sasco, where she is able to communicate a charming story with just a few slight gestures.

“There will be times you may have self-doubt but allow yourself to process it. Never give up, never stop trying. Don’t limit yourself and don’t listen to people who tell you that you can’t or that time is running out. Most importantly practice patience.

Being a female DJ is not a novel idea in Jamaica, there are a few, but with the trending, IG lives and song battles, most of the related content has been filled with attention seekers, often with no real plan. She hasn’t allowed the lack of outdoor events to stop her from bringing new energy to the platform with themed DJ sessions.

Her music tastes aren’t average, you will find afro-beats mixed in with a few dancehall rhythms but she definitely makes you feel like you’re on an island in Ibiza instead of Jamaica.

Gabby also has an online store, where she shares her favourite things called www.shopwithgabby.com

Guest Blog by Coach and Mentor Andre Ferguson: Know Your Worth and Invest in Yourself

Andre Ferguson works with you on a personal level to understand your key challenges and how you can overcome them through learning from your back story and taking direct action.

I have been struggling all my life, from when I was a child of only 10-years-old to an adult. My struggles were mainly internal as I was always questioning my self-worth, my purpose, and my reason for being here. 

When I was 10, I struggled with depression and had continuous suicidal thoughts because of the way I was treated by the one person who was supposed to love and appreciate me. Being told that I was no good and that they would be better off without my existence took a major toll on me. All of this coming from the person who is supposed to love and shelter you can have a major impact on your life. While I was grateful that I was provided for at all times with clothes, food, and shelter, I was still left unsatisfied internally. 

Emotional Struggle

While I was young, I would struggle to get a hug or even a word of appreciation. So moving forward, this made things difficult for me emotionally. I was completely detached from everyone, mostly because I wasn’t taught the right things and how to be emotionally attached to others.

When I was in high school, I didn’t know how to express myself to anyone. I was considered a recluse even though I was surrounded by great friends all the time. I was usually the one who sat in the corner and didn’t talk. Even though I wasn’t much of a talker, being at school was my escape from what I went through at home. 

Spending time at home was the worst considering the constant backlash I would receive. The idea of being alone in the house and hearing nothing but continuous criticism from that person was something I wanted to avoid. There was not a single spec of love within the household. Being told that I wouldn’t be able to do anything in my life by the person that was supposed to do the opposite was the main reason for my struggle. These feelings stayed with me as I grew up and became a major part of me throughout my life. 

The Impact Of Internal Struggle On Life

When I moved to the UK, these struggles stayed with me and there was no running away from them. Even after turning 30, I continued to struggle internally as nothing would be good enough, no matter what I do. My struggles manifested in different ways over time. I became a perfectionist, I wanted to make sure that everything was perfect; the way I want it. This took a toll on my children and my other relationships as well. I had a lowered sense of trust in others. 

Throughout my life, I had a problem trusting women mostly as the underlying reason for my struggles revolved around a woman who didn’t love me. The only thing that would come to my head when I would be with a woman is that they would hurt me. This was one of the deepest and extreme struggles I have had since I was young. Because of this, I struggled in school even though I had enough ability to get my school work done but I was emotionally drained and damaged to do anything so I focused on thinking about other things. I struggled to connect with others and create lasting relationships. 

Because of how I was raised, I started treating women a certain way. Since being hurt again by a woman was not an option, my defense mechanism emerged into womanizing. All I thought about was that nobody was going to love me or appreciate me. To get rid of the feeling, I would have numerous girls around me all the time. It was difficult for me to trust them and I knew that every time a woman stepped out of my house, they would take a piece of me. I would hurt myself and hurt them simultaneously. But I didn’t want to accept the truth behind what I was doing and it carried on for years. 

This is only a small part of the struggle that I dealt with. I struggled with emotions, understanding, acceptance, hope, kindness, and more, all of which I didn’t have while growing up. 

Andre’s partner, wife,for the last 5 years has been a blessing . She helps keep him grounded and supports him fully through everything. Having someone who loves and appreciates you makes you want to do better.

Know Your Worth And Invest In Yourself

During the last 10 years, I have changed myself and started living the way I wanted to and the way I should have been living since the start. I still have a long way to go but I am on the road and I’m closer to where I need to be now than I was ever before.

For a major part of my life, I would claw, push, and fight to get the attention that I wanted. I felt like nobody could see me and that made me want to fight for the attention always. But over time, things have changed, and I have learned to accept myself.

The only way I got out of this situation was after I took sabbatical for a year. This made me analyze things and made me realize my self-worth. I accepted how I hurt myself and others around me while I took a break from every wrong thing that I was doing. 

You can only truly get over the trauma and struggle once you invest in yourself and come to terms with things that go on in your life. It was after I took time out myself that I realized what my true worth is. 

Even though I will always be susceptible to some form of emotional trauma as I have been through a lot. But I need to fight it off myself and accept myself. This has led me to be surrounded by people I can rely on.

My partner, my wife, since the last 5 years has been a blessing for me. She helps me keep my ground now and supports me fully through everything. Having someone who loves and appreciates you makes you want to do better. 

In the end, it is okay not to be okay. But we need to continuously work towards accepting who we are and where we are. This will help us write our own story and reach the place where we want to be.  

Andre Ferguson is a family man, Speaker, coach and mentor who helps the modern man go from struggle to victory, making him realise the reasons for his struggles and bringing him to live his purpose. Learn more about him on www.andreferguson.com. You can also follow him on instagram at andreoferguson

How Brands and Creators can benefit in the Age of COVID-19

We tell stories to our friends and colleagues all the time. We love the way a story brings people closer together: how it always reminds you of a person or time, brings the children closer together at storytime, keeps us on the phone with our girlfriends a little longer, keeps us up late in bed to read one more chapter – just to hear a good story.

I launched The Storyteller Agency.Co in January 2020 and we had a great start building long-term partnerships with a non-profit, creating content for brands that needed to connect using locally relevant imagery. To date, we’ve worked with brands such as Joy Spence’s Appleton Estate Night Rum Tour with Freddie McGregor, Ministry of Culture, Gender, and Sport covering Reggae Month, visited by invitation only the home of Cafe Blue, Clifton Mount Estate in the Blue Mountains and several launches and appearances. We were set to work with a regional restaurant chain in March but that got put on hold. Now in its fifth month after doing some great projects, much of our activity has slowed due to COVID-19.

We often pitch to brands and are constantly working on building brand partnerships for the talent on our roster which includes YouTubers, celebrity photographers, bloggers, and influencers. 

In February 2020, Hootsuite issued their annual Digital Report, of the 1.63 million internet users there were 1.30 million social media users in Jamaica*(January 2020). That study also showed that the number of social media users in Jamaica increased by 106 thousand (+8.8%) between April 2019 and January 2020. In February 2020, Instagram had 660,000 users. However, Google search still gets far greater traffic.

Google.com is the number one website and search engine in Jamaica. It’s the first place Jamaicans go to search for anything. Yet brands are still using influencers who are only on Instagram. For Reggae Month our influencer campaign was robust, it included Instagram posts and IG takeovers but were supported by blogs to spread the key messages and coverage of the campaign. The blogs ranked on the first page of Google, second to major publications.

In the age of COVID-19, brands are flocking to IG with lives but they should think more long-term. With more people staying at home due to homeschooling and working from home, brands need to focus on how people consume their products in their environment.

More people are spending time on their phones due to curfew but we also know that there is more to connecting with an audience than Instagram. An IG Live stays up for 24 hours and then disappears. I’m suggesting that brands also focus on YouTube which is ranked the second most frequented site on the internet for Jamaicans. YouTube has a far greater reach and stays “live” forever, even if you go live. 

YouTuber Annesha Adams used to create travel tips for tourists wanting to visit Jamaica. She also did series on best places to go in Manchester, St. Elizabeth and so on. She had to make a shift since beaches are closed, so she’s sharing more in-depth tips on how to start your own YouTube channel and how to make money online until this is all over.

Some ideas for brands to sponsor during this time are highlighting home consumption and building an emotional connection, by sponsoring Netflix reaction videos, easy to make at home recipes, reviews of tech products and give room makeovers.

Instagram has just started a beta monetization platform, so influencers and musicians will only benefit through brand sponsorships. By going Live on YouTube, content creators can still reap the benefits of monetization even after the event has ended.

YouTuber Annesha Adams on Profiting from Passion

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To launch my Creatives of the Future e-book, (to purchase, click here) I interviewed some creatives who were already monetizing their platforms because of their work on social media. One of those people is Jamaican-Canadian YouTuber Annesha Adams.

Subscribe to Annesha Adam’s YouTube Channel

What do you do for a living? I create lifestyle content on YouTube
How many followers do you have? On Instagram 5,000 and YouTube 30,000. I am currently really working on growing my Instagram following.
If you could eat any type of food (right now) what would you buy?  Jamaican Curry chicken and white rice. OH SO GOOD!
What is your dream job? My dream job is to be an entrepreneur and work in the tourism industry in Jamaica. But the rest is a secret I will share soon!
What Netflix series are you binging on?  Oh, I don’t really watch Netflix. I’ll watch a movie on it, once every 7 months.
Favourite Influencer/YouTuber of all time?  Oh this one is difficult. I have so many because I like each influencer for a specific reason. But, I really admire the influence Vybz Kartel has. It may because he has been sovereign in his field, consistent for YEARS, trendy and abnormally creative but, his willpower is impressive. He could influence anyone to do anything. He could talk about how much he loves a certain flower, and everyone would buy and love the flower as well. He could laugh a certain way and then everyone would want to laugh like him as well. It’s impressive I tell you.


How has social media helped your career?  Social media has helped me in every way possible. My career is social media! Social media connects me to brands, people from all around the world, educate me, assisted with being my own boss, live anywhere in this world and increased my income! I could go on forever.
What advice would you give others trying to make a name for themselves? No matter what field you are in and what you love, consistency will help you to grow and be successful! Consistency brings results! In addition with branding. Branding yourself through photo, video or audio creates trust and legitimacy with others. Be consistent with your branding and people will follow and share. These two things will help to make a name for yourself and for you to be sovereign in the field you are in. Oh, and everything takes time, your patience will be a reward!
What is the last thing you liked on social media? A Jamaica travel photo ️
Who is your hero? I don’t have one. Well, I would think all my heros are my black activists around this world who had fought and continue to fight for black rights.
How did you get into YouTube? I got into YouTube a few years ago after noticing people could profit from their passions. It inspired me to do the same!
Where do you see your career going in the next few years? I see my brand growing, evolving and being successful.
What inspires you to create? Life. things that happen in everyday life, people and scenery. The things I do on a daily inspire me to come up with helpful YouTube videos. The stories my friends, family and I share amongst each other and the daily life experiences learnt helps me to create content to share on YouTube! For photos, my inspiration is scenery. While I’m driving or walking, I’m always looking at the scenery around me. I get inspired by seeing ‘pretty’ scenery which then inspires me to plan a photoshoot there. Also, I get inspiration from other people on YouTube and Instagram, seeing other people’s consistency, creative and beautiful work continues to drive me to consistently work smart, learn more about the fields I’m in and grow!

“I really admire the influence Vybz Kartel has. It may because he has been sovereign in his field, consistent for YEARS, trendy and abnormally creative but, his willpower is impressive. He could influence anyone to do anything.”

Ever since she could remember, Jamaica has held an important part of her life. Being introduced to such a distinct, vibrant, creative and confident culture and people, made her fall in love, and she never looked elsewhere. Being Jamaican is definitely an experience she would not change for the world. She considers Jamaica, the land of wood, water and wellness because of the calming spaces like the countryside and the beach.

Originally from Scarborough, Ontario, Canada, born September 9th, 1996, Annesha comes from a big family of seven sisters and one brother all from the same parents. She was first introduced to the island by her proud Jamaican parents who raised her, authentic Jamaican cuisine, non-stop dancehall and reggae music playing and vibes! Although, she is Jamaican through descent, being a part of the culture has been one thing she grew up being aware of. She now lives and resides in Mandeville and makes a living as a YouTuber, vlogging about everything from the best places to visit to how-tos and hair tutorials.

Annesha was nominated as one of Bashy’s YouTubers to watch in 2020.

How artists and creatives offer hope during the COVID-19 crisis

To launch my Creatives of the Future e-book, (to sign up to receive it, click here) I researched creatives who are using their platforms to spread awareness about taking precautions in fighting COVID-19: including wearing masks, staying home and social distancing.

More and more everyday people are being diagnosed with COVID-19, critical resources are stretched, the very essence of our freedom is shrinking – and yet we are moved inward, to the inner space of our thoughts and imagination, a place we have perhaps neglected. Of all the necessities we now feel so keenly aware of, the arts and their contribution to our well-being is evident and, in some ways, central to COVID-19 confinement for those of us locked in at home. For some, there are more pressing needs. But momentary joys, even in dire circumstances, often come through the arts and collective expression.

People on social media are sharing favourite Apocalypse playlists, Netflix movies, TikTok videos and even artwork to reach out beyond isolation and share what they love.

Artists are also finding creative ways to keep people connected during a pandemic that keeps us apart.

Besides the usual IG lives, some Jamaican creatives are raising awareness by swapping physical performance spaces for virtual ones. Londie Murray teamed up The Fix, a podcast usually reserved for interviewing dancehall artists to live stream on their YouTube channel of over 111,000 subscribers.

VIRTUAL LIVE MUSIC SERIES: SUNDAY LIVE!

 Sunday Live! is an online concert series that aims to give artistes the chance to reach an audience that they’re not able to physically due to COVID-19 restrictions. 

They’re trying to raise funds to purchase masks to donate to the infirmaries in St. James and an orphanage & battered women shelter in Montego Bay. 

Sunday Live! is sponsored by Sagicor Bank Jamaica, Rainforest Seafood, Buzz Caribbean, Pier 1, MDLink, John Swaby Entertainment, Orijin Juices and iCreate.

Watch the lastest episode with ft. Joby Jay, Royal Blu & Indie Allen – 

Sunday Live! is an online concert series that aims to give artiste the chance to perform for the public that they’re not able to physically reach due to COVID-19 restrictions.

COMMUNICATING SOCIAL DISTANCING

Phillip J Clayton created an Facebook frame to create awareness about social distancing

public awareness campaign is a marketing effort to build public recognition of a problem through media, messaging, and an organized set of communication tactics. These campaigns target a large number of people over a specific period of time to try and generate specific outcomes or achieve pre-determined goals

Art connects us to the foreign, the exotic and the impossible – but in our current context, it also connects is a means to educate. Phillip J Clayton created a Facebook frame to create awareness about social distancing. Click here to add a Facebook frame to your profile picture.

If the story about Covid-19 is told from a different perspective, the communication could focus on something deeper for greater impact…all groups of people are at risk, and can be infected or be affected in some way – Children will lose parents, it’s everyone’s duty to participate with the guidelines provided by the WHO, CDC and all relevant agencies and governments- Phillip J Clayton

SPEAKING IN THE LANGUAGE OF THE PEOPLE

Kenia Mattis the founder of ListenMi, an animation pre-production and design studio for diverse content created Fimimoji, which are free Jamaican Whatsapp stickers to help you share how you really feel in a creative way. From a mask emoji to the ever essential cleaning agent Dettal, there is something to share your expression of the reality of the virus.

We need to be socially distant while staying connected with those we care about. But how we communicate is as important as what we have to say. The team, led on this project by Jenille Brown, wanted to create Whatsapp emojis to help people share important messages the way Jamaicans can; with creativity and vibes. There’s lots of serious and positive information to share. We hope these stickers help people get their audience’s attention– Kenia Mattis

Download today 

BREEDING EMOTION

As more cases rise some creatives are speaking to emotion. In times of crisis, design and visual messaging are more important than ever.

I feel at this time creatives should dedicate some time and create awareness through their skill set- whether through animation, motion graphics, graphic design or any creative gift of expression.

We are fighting against the ugliness of poor design communication but we can come together and create something impactful or emotional to drive the seriousness of the situation that’s in effect currently.

Yes some of us were laid off, some of us have lost revenue but let’s also bring hope as a community. -Keifer Simpson

HEALING THROUGH ART

It is recognized that adult coloring activity has great virtues in our behavior and on the brain. Indeed, adult coloring will allow you to isolate yourself, to cut you off from the world for a pencil stroke. This is why many people call these drawings anti-stress coloring. In addition, the advantage of these colourings, is of course the possibility to remake them to infinity with new color palettes, and thus give them a whole other aspect. Hours of fun and relaxation to color these coloring pages for adults! At each mood, its colors!

Download here

Girl Boss Sue-Tanya McHorgh: From losing her job to Online Entrepreneur

Sue-Tanya hopes to inspire her generation to build their own online businesses. Photo Credit: Rockstaar

What is your dream job? 

To launch my Creatives of the Future e-book, (to purchase, click here) I interviewed some creatives who were already monetizing their platforms because of their work on social media. One of those people is website Designer and Blogger, Sue-Tanya Mchorgh.

  1. What is your dream job? My current job is my dream job. The ability to create and earn from something I am passionate about is a dream come true for me . A lot of people are unhappy in their jobs. Not me. I love my job. 

2. What Netflix series are you binging on? Blacklist

3. Favourite Influencer/YouTuber of all time? @Jadedarmawngsa

4. How has social media helped your career? My social media has helped me with advertising and getting targeted leads for my businesses.

5. What advice would you give others trying to make a name for themselves? Stay focused, have a game plan, a small circle of friends, get a mentor and follow your gut.  

6.What is the last thing you liked on social media? Cat videos. I am obsessed with them.

7. Who is your hero?  My mom. She did an amazing job raising me.

8. How did you get into blogging?  I started blogging because I wanted an outlet to share my travel and entrepreneurial experiences. 

9. Where do you see your career going in the next few years? I hope to perfect my current offerings, expand my businesses, hire employees and venture into coaching small business owners. 

10.What inspires you to create? My customers and my competitors. I love seeing my customers happy. They encourage me to create and improve on my skills. So does the competition. 

By the age of 17, Sue-Tanya Mchorgh knew she wanted to become an entrepreneur. She decided to study Business Administration but due to financial restraints, had to get a job and work overtime to pay tuition.

Juggling a 9-5 while going to school was hard work. Then she got laid off and didn’t have money to finish her studies. Thankfully, she was introduced to the world of working online as a virtual assistant and web designer. A virtual assistant, by definition, is an independent contractor who provides administrative services to clients while operating outside of the client’s office.

Today, she remotely helps clients with everything from social media, story and article writing, video editing, branding, and web design all from her home office.

Since she started in 2017, her client list has grown to include government institutions, realtors and even personal brands. She also owns an online fashion boutique called Suety’s Boutique where she sells her favorite fast-fashion finds.

Sue-Tanya modeled with Those Creative People for the launch of their Color Collection

Sue-Tanya considers herself a girl boss, which is basically a confident, capable woman who pursues her own ambitions instead of settling in life and hopes to inspire her generation through her motivational Instagram account @motivatedbysue.

Today, she’s also been able to live life on her terms by monetizing her social media platforms and carving out a niche as a content creator and blogger. On her website, www.suetanyamchorgh, she shares her opinion about everything from business to fashion. She’s worked with brands like Those Creative People, Kingston Creative, Jamaica Observer’s Take Style Out  and the Ministry of Gender, Culture, Entertainment and Sport highlighting the 2020 Reggae Month activities.

She wants to help entrepreneurs and small businesses create their e-commerce sites, branding kits and social media content. She also teaches others how to become a virtual assistant.

Girl Boss Sue-Tanya is a web designer, brand specialist, and lifestyle blogger. She’s worked with brands like CPJ, Kingston Industrial Garage, Ministry of Culture, Gender, Entertainment and Sport, Those Creative People and others. You can learn about Sue-Tanya at www.suetanyamchorgh.com

AN INTERVIEW WITH JHUNELLE JUREIDINI – BLOGGER, TRAVELLER AND STORYTELLER

Wah Gwaan! Wah deh gwaan, everyting irie? Mi deh yah, yuh know. But seriously tho, how’s everyone surviving Covid-19? Is there currently a lockdown …

AN INTERVIEW WITH JHUNELLE JUREIDINI – BLOGGER, TRAVELLER AND STORYTELLER

Kristia Franklin: Stylist Capitalizing on the TikTok wave, #DontRushChallenge

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Stylist Kristia Franklin aka MyRepeatOffender uses her personal brand to attract business and brand partnerships.

To launch my Creatives of the Future e-book, (to purchase, click here) I interviewed some creatives who were already monetizing their platforms because of their work on social media. 

  1. What do you do for a living? Owner of @tiaclothesgirl, an online store and a stylist. 
  2. How many followers do you have? 8497 followers
  3. If you could eat any type of food (right now) what would you buy?  Several! Green Thai Curry shrimp from Tamarind, pasta from South Ave Grill, Avocado Spring roll and fried ice cream.
  4. What is your dream job? My dream job is what I’m doing now but on a larger scale and with more free time to travel for luxury and philanthropic opportunities. 
  5. What Netflix series are you binging on? Just finished Ozark.
  6. Favourite Influencer/YouTuber of all time?  I don’t have one to be honest. Just several I like for different reasons. 
  7. How has social media helped your career?  It started my career actually. Instagram has made tiaclothesgirl possible and it has also made my personal brand possible as well. 
  8. What advice would you give others trying to make a name for themselves? Just be true to yourself. Show people the real you. 
  9. What is the last thing you liked on social media? A pic of a bad ass outfit. 
  10. Who is your hero? Jesus Christ
My Repeat Offender’s before look for the #DontRushChallenge where she uses the makeup brush as a metaphor to transform her look.

A sudden wave of challenges have started during this whole COVID-19 pandemic, as more people are flooding to TikTok, the leading destination for short-form mobile video—which now boasts over 800 million users worldwide. TikTok is an app for making and sharing short videos. The videos are tall, not square, like  Snapchat or Instagram’s stories, but you navigate through videos by scrolling up and down, like a feed, not by tapping or swiping side to side.

Creators have access to several filters and editing features. Challenges are quite popular but one causing a stir is the #DontRushChallenge.Various iterations of the #DontRushChallenge include different songs that feature moms,health workers, men, makeup artists, and different nationalities.

My Repeat Offender’s shows you can dress up even if you’re at home

The #DontRushChallenge is a scenario where creators transform from homely to glam to the popular song, Don’t Rush by U.K. rap duo,  Young T and Bugsy while “passing along” a makeup brush used as a metaphorical baton.

Stylist Kristia Franklin, otherwise known as @MyRepeatOffender on Instagram has joined the many other creators in the  #DontRushChallenge by participating in not one, but two of these challenges.

Follow MyRepeatOffender on TikTok

She has collaborated with other creators @cocoislandgal @_ashleycarla, @leighnic, @iam_brandii, @jobyjaymusic, @piavonique, @ruthxrobby, @ashleysaige, @mynamesdora_ , @daanielle.xo, @suebie__, @a.swappstyle, @jenequep. They chose to do the final video to a song produced by @toniochromatic that went viral on social media.

The other #DontRushChallenge she created with her high school friends, which also went viral.

“This #DontRushChallenge has allowed me to collab with other creators,  and keep a connection to my followers. I’m used to getting dressed up and going out and since we’re on curfew due to COVID-19, this is my way of still having that outlet.  I love playing with makeup, getting dressed up and showing different looks, so the challenge was just a fun way of doing that!” she said.

Many creators are doing this, by recording and sharing their videos via WhatsApp, compiling and editing them in TikTok, which has features to make the 26-second video seamless.

Just like any other fashion-focused creator, Kristia has capitalized on this trend by posting her style looks, many of which she recommends to her clients.

Since COVID-19 lockdown, her usual brand partnerships have been on hiatus but this hasn’t stopped Kristia from keeping relevant in the space. 

Kristia doesn’t have 100,000 instagram followers, nor does she own a blog or YouTube channel and yet she’s been able to monetize her social media platform. How does Kristia manage to do this?

Franklin, who was crowned Campari Pop Style’s Most Stylish Female after an island-wide search in 2017, has always been a solo-preneur. She joins a generation of creatives who make more money living their dream than working at a job to survive.

Even as a child Franklin knew that she wanted to be an entrepreneur, “One day we were going to Portmore and I told my mother I wanted ice cream and she told me if I sold one shirt I would get it. I sold three, and from there I knew I wanted to be in sales.” she said.

After attending the University of Technology (UTech) Jamaica, Kristia started selling fast fashion clothing she bought on her travels through her website. Using social media to drive traffic to her website, Kristia would use models to create fashion editorial style photos.

“This created a lot of buzz and my following grew,” Kristia said. However, Kristia also used her personal brand as well by posting three different ways to wear an outfit, hence her Instagram name, My Repeat Offender.

By creating eye-catching, brightly colored, edgy looks, Kristia has drawn the attention of many, with clients ranging from party-goers to businesswomen. She’s worked with Miss Jamaica Universe 2014 and model Kaci Fennel, model and marketer Jeneque Pinnock and publicist and former television producer Alison Moss-Solomon to name a few.

Kristia is known for creating a memorable look that will have photographers begging to capture as soon as they arrive to the event.

She’s also been able to monetize with her social media platform by establishing partnerships with local brands. Working with these companies have allowed her a lot of creative freedom, as most brands want a message that feels natural and seamless.

She does this by creating posting photos of herself in exotic locations both in Jamaica and internationally. This garners many likes and a lot of engagement. “It is my online picture book which allows me to capture the essence of my trips whether I’m on vacation in Bali or taking a road trip to the North Coast.” she says.

Kristia continues to think of ways of keeping her brand relevant during this time by sharing her passion for fashion.

Self-Taught Creative Rockstaar: How He Made Money Through Instagram

Rockstaar in Accra, Ghana

To launch my Creatives of the Future e-book, (to purchase click here) I interviewed some creatives who were already monetizing their platforms because of their work on social media. One of those people is creative director Rockstaar. Here is his story.

  1. What do you do for a living? All-round creative: creative director, photographer and videographer.
  2. How many followers do you have? 9,289 followers
  3. If you could eat any type of food (right now) what would you buy?  pasta
  4. What is your dream job? Restaurant owner
  5. What Netflix series are you binging on? Narcos
  6. Favourite Influencer/YouTuber of all time?  None.
  7. How has social media helped your career?  Strangely, every time I post I get a new client from social media.
  8. What advice would you give others trying to make a name for themselves?  “Believe in you like how you’d believe in someone else.”
  9. What is the last thing you liked on social media? My artwork for a client
  10. Who is your hero? My mom.

There’s a new wave of entertainers and musicians using social media more often nowadays as COVID-19 forces more people indoors. Producer Rvssian has interviewed IG models on IG live. Deejays are hosting online radio parties, but the average creative is still skeptical about how to make money through social media.

Some photographers have this innate fear of posting their photos on social media because of worry that people will steal their content. They often find ways to watermark them but Peter Clarke, more popularly known as Rockstaar,  is never worried, because he knows that social media has changed his life.

The Jamaican-born self-taught creative, Rockstaar has amassed almost 10,000 followers on Instagram because of his iconic perspectives and wide-angled shots. “Everytime I post a picture on social media, a potential client reaches out to me,” he says. Which shows the value of a DM.

In front of an undisclosed river in Guyana

Most big artists and mega-influencers don’t respond to DMs because they don’t know who the message is coming from, but when you understand that potential business can come from a message, it matters.

It’s not surprising, because when HootSuite issued their annual 2020 Digital Report, of the 1.63 million internet users in Jamaica, there are 1.30 million people on social media. 660,000 of those are on Instagram.

Instagram is not just for IG models, alot of musicians have been discovered on the internet, but few talk about the creatives behind the artistes that support to make their messages more impactful.

His self-portraits, are usually in a exotic location, everywhere from standing in front of a sports car in Accra, Ghana to sitting on the patio of a mansion in Los Angeles. His travels have exposed him to architecture, art and other cultures and helped enhance his view of the world, which is shown in his work.

Rockstaar was born in Thompson Pen, Spanish Town and at the age of 8,  moved with his immediate family including a younger sibling to live in Bridgeview, Portmore. At that time, he was attending George Headley Primary School and exposed to the wonders of technology, and decided he wanted to pursue ICT (Information Communication Technology) as a career.

With a sports car in Accra, Ghana

In Grade 9, he had to move back to Spanish Town to live with his grandmother and  finished high school. It was then that he was gifted with his first Canon camera and started to do self-portraits with a timer as a hobby. 

He decided to pursue IT at the college level but after his first year, due to transportation difficulties, he dropped out.

Shortly after, he met into a car accident that challenged him to reevaluate his life and take things more seriously, so he decided to start traveling and planned to eventually migrate to Canada. 

He started posting  self-portraits of his travel adventures on  Instagram and was discovered by a member of dancehall artist’s Alkaline’s production team who eventually hired him as a event photographer to cover his concerts and journey. He also shot Akaline’s 2018 hit, “Perfect”, which has received to date over 7,601,711 views on YouTube.

Rockstaar with the Man Himself.

Working with Akaline has allowed him to travel to countries like Ghana, Cayman, Germany, Trinidad, Grenada, Bahamas and Guyana.  Being on Instagram has also exposed him to other artistes who have hired him to do creative work such as J. Prynse, Narkoz, Iwaata, Trance Outlaw, Jahvillani, among others. 

He’s also branched out into doing wedding, lifestyle, corporate and personal branding shoots.

Whilst the journey hasn’t been the easiest, the rewards by staying motivated has been working out for the young creative thus far as he continues to develop his skills, earn new clientele, travel the world and experience new cultures while doing what he loves.

Follow Rockstaar on instagram www.instagram.com/rockstaar_