How to Be an Influencer/Blogger

Fashion and beauty are popular industries to capitalize on

On Valentine’s Day, February 14th, I was specially invited by the Ministry of Education, Heart/ NTA and Kingston Creative to present on the career paths of a social media influencer and blogger to a group of children from ages 11-17 year olds, grades 7 to nine at the Creative and Cultural Expo at the Institute of Jamaica. Children from as far as St. Elizabeth came for the presentation, and it was a pleasure to have a discussion about the career paths in the digital space. The entire day was dedicated to to Creative Economy Careers! Podcasting, game development and animation were the other career paths presented and it was insightful to see how each presenter received feedback from the audience.

Every speaking engagement I do, I always tailor the presentation to the audience. (You can download the link below) These were young, bright students from all over the island, including as far as St. Elizabeth. They were responsive and eager to hear the different options available to them. I explained that their interests don’t have to be narrowed to comedy, fashion and beauty like most of the popular influencers. They can be influencers in finance, culinary arts, the environment, the topics are endless. I also wanted to make sure they understood the dangers of being a minor online and that they need their parent’s permission before they start.

With mobile penetration growing at the rate it is, it’s great to see that the government is looking to empower the next generation on the future of work, which is Digital.

Digital Transformation is something I’m passionate about and I feel that young people need to see what the world has to offer. More than 4.5 billion people use the internet globally and as of January 2019 in Hootsuite ‘s latest report, 1. 20 million of those are in Jamaica. I spoke about how I built my website in a day even though I failed HTML coding in college. 🤔 Now, why don’t you have a blog yet?

ABOUT KINGSTON CREATIVE

This post is brought to you by Love Not Likes partnership with Kingston Creative. All reviews and opinions expressed in this post are based on my personal view.

Kingston Creative is a registered nonprofit organisation that believes that Kingston is the Creative Capital of the Caribbean. More information can be found at www.kingstoncreative.org.  The NGO is developing an Art District and Creative Hub in Downtown Kingston, Jamaica in partnership with the following “First 50” Sponsors.

Last Artwalk of 2019: Nod to The Past But Looking to the Future

The last Kingston Creative Artwalk of 2019 was invigorating. Who knew that in 2018 when the Kingston Creative team conceptualized this event that it would have grown to what it is today?

Bran Pinnock’s “You Can call me on my Payphone”

I walked from the car to the F&B parking lot, a walk I’ve done many times before but this time it was different. Being Christmas time, there was an energy in the air. I was greeted by the usual volunteers who showed me around. I hadn’t bought my Christmas gifts yet, so I was happy to see vendors with different gift ideas. One of my favourite local artisans, Touch by VLS was there as well as others selling clothing and lots of jewelry.

Each greeted me with a smile. For a small alley, the artisans are the heart of Artwalk as they bring us back to the purpose of Kingston Creative, which is to invigorate the arts community.

I bought children’s books from Jamaican authors for my niece and nephew and a book called “Girl Boss” by Sophia Amoruso from Bookophilia and got a nice Christmas discount.

Bookophilia selling children’s books by Jamaican Authors

There was a lot to cover that day, but the first place I went to was the abandoned building at 132 Harbour Street that the team had transformed into a gallery space for the Artist’s Talk with the award-winning artist Phillip Thomas. I spent some time with Phillip when he was exhibiting at The RJD Gallery in the Hamptons one summer. 

Phillip, who is a lecturer at Edna Manley, has shows internationally at least 3 times a year and really has an understanding of the global art market. He mixes Old Masters techniques with modern textures and patterns.

Nanook artists work on display

The exhibition entitled “[UN]finished”, was conceptualized by independent curator and art historian Veerle Poupeye and featured work by emerging artists from the Edna Manley College. Current students Kobi Bailey, Demar Brackenridge, Sasha-Kay Hinds, Tevin Lewis and Brad Pinnock had their pieces upstairs. It also included work by two recent graduates, Yvad Campbell and Trishaunna Henry. 

Joan Webley of Itopia LIfe and the artists from Nanook also had their artwork on display. Nanook was a live art series with artists at all stages of their development. The pieces were done on paper and cardboard and have traveled all over the world for exhibitions.

I spoke to Brad Pinnock who had two pieces on display. An installation which is an old Cable & Wireless phone booth that was painted and said “You can call me on my payphone” a nod to Drake’s song, “Hotline Bling”.

He also showed me a self portrait with his alter egos, one of him sitting on a chair wearing a bright multi-coloured jacket with a crown, smoking a spliff. His other representation of himself was him sitting wearing glasses and reading a book. He explained that its a constant struggle for him to go between both personas.

We spoke about many things, but one of the main things that came out of the conversation is the lack of places for artists like him to display his work.

Man of Valor by Yvad Campbell on display at Unfinished, curated by Veerle Poupeye at Kingston Creative’s Artwalk December 2019

I was particularly drawn to the piece by Yvad Campbell, who had a portrait of Vybz Kartel entitled, “Man of Valor”. He was dressed like a military leader,  decorated with medals, a fur shoal and white gloves. He appeared to be looking down on me and I couldn’t help but snap a picture of me with the piece.

Being a formal artist myself, (I’m a graduate of Pratt Institute), I was emotional about how far Kingston Creative has come and how much they are investing in growing the artist’s community. It also had me thinking about this need for temporary spaces to celebrate art in all its forms.

I was also touched by the Moko Jumbie stilt dancers by L’Acadco and the traditional Jonkonnu Band (South West St. Andrews Jonkonnu) that flooded the Downtown streets and brought me back to a time when I used to see them outside of my house at Christmastime.

For me, art doesn’t have to be in a gallery to be appreciated and we see it everyday on the side of the road, as the street artists display their paintings and crafts in the sun.

But similarly, how graffiti artists have the walls of urban areas to share their art, Jamaica now has a space for hobbyists, amateurs, the undiscovered and even bright stars to showcase their work and I’m so happy.

ABOUT KINGSTON CREATIVE

This post is in partnership with Love Not Likes Blogger Network and Kingston Creative. All reviews and opinions expressed in this post are based on my personal view.

Kingston Creative is a registered nonprofit organisation that believes that Kingston is the Creative Capital of the Caribbean. More information can be found at www.kingstoncreative.org.  The NGO is developing an Art District and Creative Hub in Downtown Kingston, Jamaica in partnership with the following “First 50” Sponsors.

Down in Jamaica Where I Born and Grow: Ode to Reggae Month

Love Not Likes blogging network I founded recently signed on to help The Ministry of Culture, Entertainment, Gender and Sport to spread the word about Reggae Month in the online space including social media and blogs.

The goal of Reggae Month is to attract international acclaim for Jamaica as the reggae mecca of the world, enhance travel and tourism for the month of February, and provide an educational platform of entertainment for all ages.

One of the bloggers was out of the country and I filled in, so I went to Montego Bay to cover the first Children of the Icons concert held in Sam Sharpe Square. The first thing I have to tell you about these Reggae Month events is that they are all FREE. It’s amazing to see the wonderful talent that exists in this country.

We traveled on the bus with the musicians who were mostly quiet and reflective. When we got to the Square, I was amazed by the set up. The backdrop was the Sam Sharpe Cultural Centre and on the side of the building was Haile Selassie looking down on us.

The acts that came on were Imeru Tafari (Ifrica’s son), Jahbari, Indie Allen (who is slated to be at the Jamaica Rum Festival March 1st, 2020, another great event put on by the Ministry of Tourism) considers himself an emerging artist but I must say he’s now my new favourite. With charisma that of a seasoned performer, his song, ” Catch a Fire” is now fully repeat on the playlist. Another amazing performer was Richie Spice, who energized the crowd. Richie Spice sang all the songs I’d hadn’t heard in years–Earth a Run Red, Brown Skin, Ghetto Girl…all of them!

Richie is the representation of everything Reggae Month represents, the brother of Pliers and has been singing since the 90’s. He’s been traveling around the world, carrying the message of reggae all the while staying true to himself. Giving the same energy that he would have given a crowd of 10,000 people, I was honored to hear his new release, “Together We Stand”.

Jamaica Jamaica Exhibition launched 02.02.2020, a palendrome day–the first one in 909 years. Photo Credit: Courtseye Visuals
Ebony Patterson’s installation was the nod to the future of reggae music. Photo Credit: Courts Eye Visuals
Diedre in Wanderland covered Reggae Month’s IG Stories for the launch of NGJ’s Jamaica Jamaica exhibition

On 02.02.2020 the first global palindrome day in 909 years, according to CNN.com, The Ministry of Culture, Gender, Entertainment and Sports, the National Gallery of Jamaica (NGJ) and the Jamaica Music Museum along with with La Philharmonie de Paris opened the first of its kind Jamaica, Jamaica!

World Nomad contributor and international travel writer Diedre of http://www.DiedreinWanderland.com was assigned to cover the exhibition as well as the film series for the month. She took over Reggae Month’s IG stories for the day and showed what to expect from the exhibition. Check out http://www.instagram.com/reggaemonthja IG highlights to see an insider’s view of the exhibition.

Initially launched at Philharmonie de Paris in 2017 and titled after the 1985 hit song by Brigadier “The General” Jerry, Jamaica, Jamaica! examines Jamaica has become an extraordinary force in the world heritage and history of music.

From the Afflicted Yard’s photos of Sean Paul, Ninja Man and Vybz Kartel to Peter Tosh’s famed M16 Guitar and the rod that late Prime Minister, Micheal Manley stretched out to the audience as he shared the stage with music icon Bob Marley and late Prime Minister Edward Seaga during the historic “One Love” Peace Concert in Kingston in 1978, the “Jamaica Jamaica Exhibition” features rare memorabilia, photographs, audio-visual clips and art pieces that provides evidence of the potency of how music simultaneously shaped Jamaican culture while impacting world history.

Jamaican music is known world wide yet, its rich history and diversity is often overshadowed by its most famous icon, reggae superstar Bob Marley. This exhibition aims at showcasing a broader vision that has allowed the world to know the island’s music, by digging deep into its past and present in search for the roots of “rebel music”, beyond the cliché and the postcard.

The most ambitious exhibition ever staged on the topic, Jamaica, Jamaica! celebrates the musical innovations born on the island in its specific historic and social contexts, unveiling the story behind the musical genres of kumina, revival, mento, ska, rocksteady, reggae, dub and dancehall – as well as the impact of the local sound system culture, street culture, and visual arts on today’s global pop culture.

You can download the Reggae Month app on the Google Play store and Apple store. There is everything from film series to lectures and concerts. http://www.reggaemonthjamaica.com

The National Gallery of Jamaica opening hours are: Tuesdays -Thursdays: 10 am to 4:30 pm, Fridays: 10 am to 4 pm, Saturdays: 10 am to 3 pm, Last Sundays: the NGJ is open every last Sunday of the month, 11 am to 4 pm. Closed to the public on the other Sundays and on Mondays and Public Holidays (Offices are open on Mondays)

The NGJ is also occasionally open on Sundays and evenings for exhibition openings and special programmes – for more information, please visit their blog regularly.

Admission:

Adults: Ja$ 400

Why use a Micro-Influencer to Showcase your Brand?

In 2006, long before the term “influencer” was coined, I started a t-shirt line called Sprawl Tees. One of the tactics used was to invite people of influence to “rep” the brand. Everyone from musicians to socialites helped us reach thousands of people from as far as Japan. With Sprawl, I developed the brand’s story which was focused on the young, fun, hipster side of Jamaica. As a formally trained graphic designer, I designed every t-shirt. I also developed distribution lines in key areas: Kingston, Mobay and Negril. I sold online to the US, Canada and Europe.If you want to take a trip down memory lane, go here.

What is Love Not Likes?

Fast forward to present day, I launched Love Not Likes six months ago and the impact has been amazing. What is Love Not Likes? An micro-influencer/blogger-centric experiential marketing agency. We create curated experiences for YouTubers, content creators, bloggers and micro-influencers. Just for clarity, for those who aren’t familiar with the different definitions: Content creators are people who take pictures and videos, where as bloggers are those who have a website with articles but may also use imagery. Some have both photos and video, but not always. YouTubers exclusively create video content.

We’re all about inclusivity, meaning, anyone can join and be a part of the community as long as they have at least 1,000 followers. We’re a diverse group from all different niches and backgrounds, ranging from travel to beauty and lifestyle. If you want to join our community, sign up for our mailing list here.

So far, we’ve been to Monkey Island/Frenchman’s Cove and Worthy Park Estate Rum Tour. We’ve also been invited to cover events such as Kingston Creative’s ArtWalk, the opening of Gloria’s Seafood in Ocho Rios and KIG’s Jeep Wrangler Launch.

cpj glinter sutanya mchorgh

Some of the brands we’ve worked with include CPJ (Lifespan, Glinter and Energice), Those Creative People, Worthy Park Estate Rum Tour, Worthy Park, Rum Bar, Herboo Botanical, National Bakery, The Label Snob, Cafe Dolce, Oak Wine Cocktail Lounge, Sun Factory which distributes Ipanema flip flops and Grant Foster sunglasses.

Here’s what TCP had to say about working with us:

“We were looking for some great content for our social media marketing efforts, without having to do it ourselves (arrange a photoshoot, get all the talent, etc.).

LoveNotLikes helped us get great content with a variety of locations, talent and content ideas, to use without us lifting a finger.” – Marc Gayle, TCP

Here’s what full-time travel blogger Jhunelle J of simplylocal.life had to say about working with us: Through Love Not Likes, I’ve met and enjoyed the company of multiple fellow content creators. Mixing work and play has enhanced the experiences offered, while providing valuable opportunities to work directly with both established and upcoming brands

Jhunelle J. from http://www.simplylocal.life

I’ve always wanted to work with brands on social media ever since I was motivated to start a blog in 2019. Love Not Likes gave me not only my first few brand collaborations but also community where I could learn and network
with other bloggers who are inspiring and hardworking. Tahjaera of livingtheMacLife.blog

I am so happy I found this group. I met some wonderful people in similar fields and it’s been a pleasure learning about them and their journey. I also enjoy working with the brands that are affiliated with Love Not Likes. I am excited for what the future holds and other amazing trips with Love Not Likes. SueTanya Mchorgh, blogger

What is a Micro-Influencer?

We’ve helped micro-influencers, ( micro-influencers are anywhere from 100,000 to 1,000 followers) mostly under 5,000 followers, to create content for their blogs and IG pages, grow their following as well as help them connect with brands. These brands in turn have shared the content and tagged the influencers, helping them to raise their profile and followers.

In the age of the saturated influencer market in Jamaica, it’s important to establish that there are alternatives. Why pick micro-influencers to showcase your brand? Micro-Influencers offer more credibility, they’re more likely to respond and interact with their followers and guess what…build a community!

Going with a larger influencer or endorser can cost you thousands, just for one post.

So, unless you are a huge brand, that just may not be realistic or worthwhile.

A micro-influencer is much more affordable. It all depends on the number of followers and engagement.

With Instagram removing the likes button, the metrics will now be focused on shares and engagement, and ultimately conversions/sales. Bloggers also help search engine optimization and can be a permanent link to your website.

If you’re interested in partnering with us, please send an email to lovenotlikes@gmail.com. Also follow us on IG here.

Love Not Likes: Micro-Influencers and Bloggers Take on Jamaica

I’ve been working in advertising for over 15 years, and as someone who used “influencers” (there wasn’t a name for it at the time) to sell t-shirts online for 2 years, I understand the value of an influencer.

The community is small is in Jamaica, totaling about 20-30 major influencers made up of mostly comedians, lifestyle, beauty and public figure categories.

I was nominated as a People to Watch in 2019, by Kadia Francis, aka the Digital Jamaican who scoured the internet to find micro-influencers and bloggers who write mostly for the love of it and not necessarily the recognition. A micro-influencer tends to have less than 10,000 followers but usually has an intimate community. ( I listed using micro-influencers as one of the 2019 trends in social media. Read here)

We wanted to bring everyone together to bond and network. Most of the people had the same wish–to create content (whether that be in the form of writing, taking photos or making videos, etc), and being able to travel the world while doing so.

list of Jamaican bloggers. love not likes
Love Not Likes Bloggers/Content Creators in the middle of the road at Castleton Gardens

We received sponsorship from Ion Communications and LuxuryJa.

While CPJ, our official refreshment sponsor provided us with Life Span Water and Glinter sparkling water

Photo Credit: Peter Clarke, Rocket Visions JA

Rum Cream, Rumbar rum and vodka came from Worthy Park.

Snacks for the 2.5 drive from National Bakery

Sun Factory provided us with flip-flops for the beach.

Each blogger received customized mugs with their ig handle from The Label Snob , Sharmac Graphics printed the fans for each guest, Just nuff social plan (which includes data and social media) were granted by Digicel Jamaica and TCP offered the bags to carry everything in.

Watch the video of the recap.

The bloggers paid for their transportation and lunch but received reposts and comments from the sponsors, edited photos from established photographers including Machel Witter, Peter Clarke and Darren George (contracted by our partners Ion Communications), to gather content on their behalf. We were even featured on CVM Sunrise. See the full interview below.

So the most burning questions from this experience have been, why call it Love Not Likes? In April 2019, Instagram put out that they were working on changing the platform to eliminate likes, you can read the Forbes article here.

Also, as I said earlier, many of these bloggers do it because they love what they do—sharing their go-to spots in Jamaica, or their beauty secrets, etc. However, they’ve never received corporate sponsorship or even gifted merchandise.

The list of the bloggers/micro-influencers/YouTubers who attended were:

Jhunelle Jureidini: a full-time travel blogger who finds most of the unknown places in Jamaica and highlights them.

Sue-Tanya McHorgh: a website developer and lifestyle blogger who also has an online clothing store.

Diedre McLeod: A travel blogger who teaches travelers how to travel the world on a budget.

View this post on Instagram

Anybody ever ask you why you always have ONE BAG AH TINGS in your bag? 🤣 Bae is usually guilty amirite!? * You ever checked out the things you are carrying in your bag? Like really looked at what's in your bag? What do you have languishing in there? Old receipts, snack wrappers (cuz you do your part for the environment), broken makeup, random stuff that you not sure why they're ever there in the first place? LoL I may have stopped talking about a bag and now having full-on philosophical ramblings on life 🙊. But honestly, I try to be intentional about what I put in my bag. I don't want to be literally carrying around useless baggage. And this beach bag from @thosecreativepeople can really hold ONE BAG AH TINGS! Fyi it's great for trips not just to the beach. On my last trip to the beach it really shined. It's Spacious. Great for holding towels, water shoes, food, sunscreen and more. Check my blog about "How to do One Bag Ah Tings on your next trip to Portland" to see how handy the bag is (LinkInBio or bit.ly/oneBagAhTings) And tell me if you love it! * * * * * * * 📸@rockstaar_ 👜@thosecreativepeople #gifted #sponsoredpost #iamwandering #wanderoften #tcptings #thosecreativepeople #beachbagswag #beachlovers🌴 #JamaicaJamaica #proud876 #wanderlustcollection #frenchmanscove #jamaicabeach #portlandjamaica #weekendgetaways #blackgirlstraveltoo #fabuplus #blacktraveljourney #weekendmood #whatsinyourbag #cluttered #baggage #beachlifeisthebestlife #onthebeach

A post shared by Jamaican Solo Travel Planner (@diedreinwanderland) on

Lucienne Antonio: A blogger who also can secure your next budget vacation.

Kemar Royal: a content creator/droner who lives for adventure

Ronnia Cherry, a creative with multiple interests, all surrounding creating a platform for Jamaican creatives. Learn more about her

Tashi Grant: A media maven who started her lifestyle/travel blog called The Hopper

Rachael Campbell: a travel vlogger who likes to party.

Jehmeil Shrouder: a YouTuber on a mission to be successful.

Ornella Green: A lifestyle/beauty blogger who aspires to travel the world.

So I wanted to make them feel special, i.e. find a way to show them and the world, that micro-influencers have value. Many influencers only big up a brand because they are getting paid, which sometimes loses its authenticity.

So let’s even get more pedantic, people think influencer is a dirty/bad word. What is an influencer, really?

An influencer is an individual who’s capable of affecting (i.e., influencing) people’s purchase decisions because of his/her knowledge or authority. What’s more, this individual has a following – usually on social media – in a specific niche, such as fashion, food, fitness, photography, and so on. YouTube marketing is also quite common.

Tech Jury ( see article here)

According to influencer marketing research, many companies will hire brand ambassadors to promote their products. While the most visible brand ambassadors are celebrity influencers, micro-bloggers can often get in on the action, too – they increase a brand’s visibility more locally. Another sponsored content format consists of paid for articles and blogs, which appear as editorials in an online publication.

So now we have that out of the way, let’s talk about the alignment with the government’s growth strategy. Chris Dehring spoke at the Jamaica Diaspora Conference a couple of months ago and he talked about the importance of creating alternative job opportunities for young people.

The insights that came out of the trip was that most of them want to live a digital nomad lifestyle. It seems pretty simple, but when you live on an island, you tend to only think about Jamaica and even some think smaller–only Kingston and St. Andrew.

Our aim is to create a network and community with bloggers/micro-influencers who want to monetize. We’ve invited Lauren Dunn, otherwise known as Lauren O Lauren to give a masterclass at CoWork on Thursday, July 18th. Lauren has been working in Silicon Valley and has been able to grow her following and monetize for the last few years. Please call 876 881-7830 to purchase tickets.

We’re also building a community of bloggers, content creators, photographers who want to collaborate. Please follow @lovenotlikesja on Instagram or email us at lovenotlikes@gmail.com for more information.

Love Not Likes visits Kingston Creative’s Artwalk

Last Sunday, I had the pleasure of being invited to Kingston Creative’s Artwalk. We decided to partner with them for a Love Not Likes excursion. For those who don’t know, Love Not Likes is an experiential marketing agency that creates curated experiences for photographers, bloggers and creatives who want to network and collaborate.

The bloggers and creatives were @SueTanyaMcorgh @Simplylocal.life, @youtravellucie, @just.lexi.simple, @haute_people, @astoldbynella and photographers Machel Witter of @mdwmediaja and Peter Clarke from @rocketvisionsja.

Andrea Dempster-Chung, the co-founder of the Kingston Creative movement gave us a tour and spoke about the importance to gaining support from all areas of society, including creatives.

When Andrea posed the question about how do we engage corporate, we decided that the best way was to show in a real way, not through PR or posed photographs but invite bloggers and content creators to come and enjoy the experience.

It was a lovely day, particularly because we were especially invited for lunch by FNB’s Downtown, a Jamaican fusion restaurant that houses Swiss Stores and is a gallery for resident-artist Craig Phang-Sang. They are known for their famous oxtail. This is a must-have when visiting Downtown Kingston. It was also a refuge for us during the summer heat as we were treated with freshly squeezed lemonade..

We also experienced a pop-up version of The Edna Manley Final Year exhibition, curated by National Gallery’s former director, Veerle Poupeye.

Resonances features six young artists: Trishaunna Henry (BFA Sculpture), Joni P. Gordon (BFA Photography), Leanne Mair (BFA Painting), Yulanah Mullings (BFA Painting), Mark Robinson (BFA Painting), and Keisha Walters (BFA Painting). They work in media ranging from ceramic and aluminium to wood, paper and cardboard constructions, to paper and textile collage, and ranges from miniature scale to very large. Each of the six artists makes use of the resonant potential of the object and the image to speak about more than itself and to invoke stories about social, cultural and historical subjects as diverse as the experience of the Jamaican urban environment and the car culture; the personal traumas of racism, migrant work and childhood sexual abuse; the dilemmas of genetic engineering; and the historical and contemporary cultural significance of shoes.

Veerle Poupeye

The exhibition is curated by Veerle Poupeye, an art historian specialized in Caribbean art and an independent curator and writer. Dr. Poupeye is also a lecturer at the Edna Manley College.

Best part of the day, was actually getting to hang out with Charl B. The artist behind the mural, “The Tree of Life,” located behind FNB’s Downtown, off Harbour Street. There are several on the street and we took time to take them all in.

Kingston Creative has a seven year plan to create an arts district where creatives can share workspace, network and collaborate. The long term plan is create a place similar to Wynwood in Miami but they need funding to make it happen. It seems like creating an eco-system where creatives can thrive and companies can get visibility in a heavy foot traffic area seems a good fit.

The brands that have already come on board include Red Stripe, Jamaica Observer, Jamaica Gleaner, Facey Foundation, Paperboy Jamaica and others. If you would like a mural, it can be arranged, I’m here trying to figure out how I can get one myself.

73 Vogue-Inspired Questions Answered.

I’m honoured to announce that I’m a Brand ambassador for Poppy Apparel. You can use my code “KESI” and get a 10% discount here.

So in honor of this I thought I’d do a 73 questions inspired by the popular Vogue video series, so here goes:

1. What are you most excited about these days?

Truly living my best life.

2. What’s your favorite holiday?

I want to say Christmas but it’s really Easter because that’s when Marbana is and that’s the best party of the year.

3. Favorite season?

We don’t really have seasons here but I like when its really hot and you have to turn the big fan on. If you know me well, you know I hate cold and snow.

4. Where does one go on a perfect road trip?

I hardly go anywhere tbh, I’m always working but I do love a good trip to the mountains on a Sunday.

5. What is the best activity when home on a rainy day?

I love to curl up in my bed and watch YouTube videos. I only watch the news.

6. If you could switch lives with someone for a day who would it be?

Honestly, I’d love to switch lives with one of the richest female billionaires in the world and I don’t mean Kylie Jenner.

7. What is the best thing that happened this year?

Being nominated as Digital Influencer by Digital Jamaican was the best thing that happened to me so far but the year isn’t over year. See the post about it here.

8. What’s your New Year’s resolution?

I promised myself I’d go harder than ever this year, so there are a lot of sleepless nights.

9. What’s your favorite exercise?

Exercise? Honestly, don’t have the time but if i had to choose, it would be swimming. I was on the swim team in high school.

10. Best way to decompress?

Honestly, write.

11. What’s your favorite country to visit?

Omg, that’s hard. I love New York but then I practically grew up there. It does give me all the feels.

Wish you were in New York? Get a mug here

12. Last country you visited?

Miami. I lived there for two months.

13. Country you wish to visit?

I’ve always wanted to go to Santorini. I believe I will live out my last days looking at that blue ocean.

Wanna feel like you’re in Santorini? Purchase a Pura Vida bracelet, here

14. What’s your favorite ice-cream?

Coffee. I’m obsessed with anything coffee.

Speaking of coffee, here are my faves:

Starbucks Blonde Roast

Dunkin’ Donuts Hazelnut Flavored

15. What makes you smile the most?

Money. Lol. SEND ME SOME

16. What’s the coolest thing in the world?

Getting DMs from people saying that you’re awesome and they love your content.

17. What is the cutest thing in the world?

Babies?

18. How do you know if you’re in love?

Don’t know her. Don’t want to be her.

19. If you could go to any concert past or present, what would it be?

I would absolutely die to see Prince in concert. Hands down. I mourned for three days when he died.

20. What’s the best gift you’ve ever received?

A Tiffany’s bracelet. All the Jersey girls were wearing them when I was in college.

Get one like it here

21. Favorite fashion trend of all time?

I would not call myself the most fashion forward although I used to be but I did love 90’s supermodel fashion back in the day.

22. What’s your favorite movie of all time?

Eat Pray Love. I read the book first and then saw the movie. I could watch it over and over.

23. What was the movie that made you cry?

Omg. 101 Dalmations?

24. If you could make a documentary, what would it be about?

I would love to talk about the amazing content creators in Jamaica doing some amazing things. And when I say content I mean film, movies and music videos too. Not just photography.

25. If you could have one superpower what would it be?

I would love to be able to read people’s mind.

26. What is the skill still unmastered?

I still don’t know how to ride a bicycle. Long story.

27. What is the best thing that happened to you today?

The check cleared.

28. Do you like surprises?

Yes, actually my former boss gave me a birthday party in December (my birthday is in August) Wanna buy me a birthday gift? Here’s my wishlist.

29. If you could do a flash mob where would it be?

Coronation Market.

30. Do you like cupcakes?

31. Do you usually bake cupcakes?

I baked cupcakes for my daughter’s class for Valentine’s Day one year.

But, I prefer cheesecake. Buy my fave here

32. What’s your favorite desert?

Cheesecake.

More cheesecake here

33. Is there a desert you don’t like?

Vanilla cake. It’s so vanilla.

34. What’s your favorite bakery?

Anywhere that sells croissaints. There’s actually French pâtisserie downstairs from where I used to live in Park Slope in Brooklyn

35. What’s your favorite food?

It’s a toss up between Italian and sushi.

Get an Italian gift basket here

36. It’s brunch, what do you eat?

Is there mackerel rundown? Not really a fan of ackee and saltfish.

37. You are stuck on an island, you can pick one food to eat forever without getting tired of it, what would you eat?

Otaheite apples.

38. Favorite color?

Cobalt blue.

Buy a cobalt blue Corkcicle tumbler here

Buy a cobalt blue ring here

Buy a rare cobalt blue Chanel bag here

39. Favorite superhero?

Storm

40. What do you usually order in your coffee?

I used to drink only lattes but, sometimes you just need that caffeine so regular coffee with condensed milk.

But if I’m feeling fancy, I buy

41. Who is the last person you texted?

My former student Tashi

42. What’s your favorite activity to do in Kingston?

I love going to the National Gallery, I used to volunteer there on Saturdays.

43. What’s the next book you plan on reading?


44. What do you love in your pizza?

I’m one of those pineapple goes on pizza kinda gals.

Buy a pineapple towel here

45. Favorite drink?

Veuve Clicquot Champs

46. Dark chocolate or milk chocolate?

Hershey’s

47. What’s your favorite band?

I’m all about Maroon 5.

48. Favorite solo artist?

Post Malone for sure. Sunflower is on repeat.

49. Favorite lyrics?

Woman’s worth

I know you’ve got a little life in you left
I know you’ve got a lot of strength left
I know you’ve got a little life in you yet
I know you’ve got a lot of strength left

50. If your life was a song what would the title be?

Luxurious

51. If you could master one instrument what would it be?

The camera.

52. Do you have a tattoo ?

A swallow on my left ankle.

53. To be or not to be?

That is the question.

54. Dolphins or koalas?

Koalas.

55. How do you like your coffee?

With condensed milk.

56. What’s your favorite curse word?

I don’t curse. lol.

57. What color of dress did you wear to prom?

Red velvet.

58. Diamonds or pearls?

Definitely diamonds.

Buy me some.

59. Cheap shampoo or expensive?

Herbal Essence Black Charcoal Shampoo

60. Blow dry or air dry?

Air dry. No heat on these curls.

61. Heels or flats?

Omg. Flats most definitely.

My fave flats are ballet

62. Pilates or yoga?

Yoga.

63. Jogging or swimming?

Swimming. Hate to sweat.

64. One thing you can’t live without?

My laptop.

65. What’s one cause that’s dear to your heart?

Women’s Rights.

66. Who would you want to shoot a love scene with?

Brad Pitt.

67. What’s your favorite sport?

Football.

68. Do you have a morning beauty ritual?

I use a face mask once a week. That’s it.

69. What’s your favorite thing to wear?

The colour black.

70. What’s the priciest thing you’ve ever splurged on?

I bought a pair of Prada sunglasses once. Purely overrated.

Now I wear these

71. Do you play any musical instruments?

No.

72. What is your favorite book of all time?

The Alchemist by Paulo Cuehlo. Changed my life.

73. What is something you always travel with?

Coffee Travel Mug

Kate Spade Travel Mug

Ember Travel Mug

Why do People Share on Social Media?

This blog has been sitting on my chest for a couple of months. It all came out of something I had shared on social media and people’s reaction to it. It got me thinking, what drives people to share content online. So I did some research and this is what I came up with.

People share parts of their daily lives everyday. From pictures of their children to their vacation and even their private moments. But what makes us share? Is it that we want recognition for our accomplishments? Is it all about likes, shares and retweets?

Intrinsically, sharing has always been a part of our lives. Before the internet, we shared with our family at dinnertime and our coworkers. We shared our family photo albums to visitors on the couch, so the idea of sharing is not new.

According to  The Psychology of How We Share Content, by Jesse Bowman, “To really understand the psychology of sharing, we have to go back to 1966. Long before we had the retweet, Austrian psychologist, Ernest Dichter, published the Harvard Business Review article “How Word-of-Mouth Advertising Works.”

In his article, Dichter outlined four reasons that motivate people to talks about brands and products.

  1. Product Involvement (33%) – The customer’s experience is so pleasurable, it has to be shared.

  2. Self-Involvement (24%) – You, as the sharer, gain attention, feel special like you have inside information or are the first to know.

  3. Other Involvement (20%) – The sharer wants to help others.

  4. Message – Involvement (20%) – The message is so valuable that it has to be shared.

This analysis was helpful in order to understand the psychology of why people share and its incentives. But let’s dig deeper shall we?

The New York Times Customer Insight Group published the study, “The Psychology of Sharing” which divided why we share into five categories and further broke down the personas of people who share into six profiles.

Personas of Sharers (Preferred Channels)

  1. Altruists – share content to be helpful. (Facebook, Email)
  2. Careerists – share to build a professional reputation. (Linkedin, Email)
  3. Hipsters – share cutting edge and creative content that builds their identity. (Facebook, Twitter)
  4. Boomerangs – share content to get reaction from audience, seeks validation. (Facebook, Twitter)
  5. Connectors – share content to stay connected with others and make plans. (Facebook, Email)
  6. Selectives – put more thought into what they share and with whom they share it. (Email)

It’s easy to determine from both studies that people share for their own self-interests. But the last reason why we share, spread the word about causes or brands, touches on another major reason why we share: emotion.
But I think we share because it makes us look good. I also believe that people are natural storytellers, and all great brands also learn to tell stories. If you can learn to tell an interesting story, it will be shared.

Typically what leads a person to share something on social media is when it has a connection to them as an individual, be it political, emotional, cute or funny. People want to share with others how they perceive the world and reflect their tastes and how they define themselves.

So what motivates you to share? Attention? Likes? Comments? Shares? What would you like to share but don’t?

 

 

Jamaican YouTubers to Follow in 2018

I haven’t written a blog post like this in awhile and the last article I did about this topic got picked up by Buzzebly. You can read it here if you’re interested. This got the highest views to date so I’ve decided to an updated version.

Now a lot has happened in the YouTube atmosphere. A lot of the old YouTubers I mentioned before, no longer post on YouTube. I think some of the mainstays just know how to stay dedicated and keep at it. It takes awhile to build a following and with YouTube becoming the most popular network, there is a market for it.

Now I won’t list them by any relevance. These are the ones I think have the best content, regardless of subscribers.

    Dutty Berry. Dutty Berry has been doing this thing for a couple of years now and I haven’t caught up with him in awhile but I’m pretty sure he’s making a decent living off this YouTube thing along with making appearances and hosting. He has over 140,000 subs and  averages about 100,000 views per video. Dutty Berry has videos sponsored as well, which is a good move. What makes him stand out? His content. You can tell he does his research and makes sure the videos are jam-packed with jokes and up to date news and gossip.
    RushCam. Now if you haven’t seen his YouTube channel yet, you should definitely check him out. He has done a wide range of videos with very relatable Jamaican themes. Everything from Carnival to comparing Tastee and Juicy Beef. This dude has personality and the videos aren’t too long but they leave you laughing your head off and somehow wanting to know more about this character. He has the potential to really grow his following as long as he keeps paying attention to making great content.
    LaurenOLauren Lauren doesn’t live in Jamaica anymore so her videos are based on her life in California but she is still definitely worth a sub. Point blank, this media veteran is hilarious with her rants about trolls and people’s reactions to her hair. Her content has definitely improved and varied over the years and she has grown to 10,000 subs and 18,000 followers on Instagram.
    Lyric Rochester is blowing up YouTube with her makeup tutorials and has almost 200,000 subscribers. She does mostly makeup tutorials but has charisma and is interesting to watch. She’s partnered with Fontana Pharmacy in the past.
    Trabass TV is still going strong with his vlogs, music videos and comic skits. He basically just vlogs his life with his wife Deannae but he’s fun to watch and keeps his viewers entertained. He’s really trying to break into the music industry and he’s been doing it for awhile. He’s had some success with appearances and tours.
    Chantay Lainey has over 4,000 subscribers on YouTube. She does mostly makeup tutorials but has a bit of vlogs mixed in along the way. She’s a twenty-something just living her life with her friends and has brought us along for the ride!

Those are my picks if you know any YouTubers you think I should add to this list. Let me know!

I Got My Current Job Because of Linkedin!

LinkedIn-Logo[1].jpg

There is a misconception that Linkedin is not effective in Jamaica. Although recruiters and hiring managers may not frequent Linkedin as much as they do in the US, it is still a relevant way to network with other professionals and make valuable connections.

I got my current job because of Linkedin! When searching for candidates, my name kept coming up in search and so they reached out. So Jamaican employers are headhunting, especially in niche industries like Advertising.

First of all Linkedin is focused on showcasing professional accomplishments, a lot of which we don’t go about displaying in our daily lives. So put that award you won or that MBA you worked hard for. This is the place to brag a little about your accomplishments. It is the perfect place to connect with people in your industry who could potentially hire you or recommend you for a job.

So here are a few tips you can use to make your profile more appealing to potential employers:

  1. Use a professional profile photo: Take the time to invest in a professional photographer. You can hire one of many spectacular freelance photographers there are out there or you can visit Photodayz in Soverign Centre. Depending on the industry you work in you can dress accordingly. For example, if you work in accounting, you should wear a suit. However, if you work in the creative industry, you can get away with a crisp, white shirt. Women, spend a little extra and get your makeup done. A nice professional photograph just makes you put your best foot forward.
  2. Create an impactful headline: The headline under your name is the first thing people read when they search for your name. Make it count. This you can use to say one, amazing thing about you as a professional. Use adjectives that describe who you are. For example, mine says, “I build brands!” which in a nutshell what I do in my professional life. It’s catchy and it gets the attention of the people that I’m targeting– potential employers and clients.
  3. Tell a story with your bio/summary: This is the opportunity to tell a story about your professional journey and list three accomplishments you’ve made in your career thus far. Keep it concise but quanitfiable. Like for example say, “I increased productivity by 25%.”
  4. Network, network, network: Reach out to people you’ve met offline and in some instances, reach out to people you may be interested in meeting but haven’t had the opportunity yet. Be tactful in your approach. Note that while not everyone would be open to connecting with people they don’t know, others see the value in connecting online.
  5. Share valuable content: Just like any other network, sharing valuable content like blog posts, articles in your industry and quotes is crucial to raising your profile and rank on Linkedin. Share once a day to really add value. People in your network will see you as knowledgeable and come to you for advice when they need it.