YouTuber Annesha Adams on Profiting from Passion

Featured

To launch my Creatives of the Future e-book, (to purchase, click here) I interviewed some creatives who were already monetizing their platforms because of their work on social media. One of those people is Jamaican-Canadian YouTuber Annesha Adams.

Subscribe to Annesha Adam’s YouTube Channel

What do you do for a living? I create lifestyle content on YouTube
How many followers do you have? On Instagram 5,000 and YouTube 30,000. I am currently really working on growing my Instagram following.
If you could eat any type of food (right now) what would you buy?  Jamaican Curry chicken and white rice. OH SO GOOD!
What is your dream job? My dream job is to be an entrepreneur and work in the tourism industry in Jamaica. But the rest is a secret I will share soon!
What Netflix series are you binging on?  Oh, I don’t really watch Netflix. I’ll watch a movie on it, once every 7 months.
Favourite Influencer/YouTuber of all time?  Oh this one is difficult. I have so many because I like each influencer for a specific reason. But, I really admire the influence Vybz Kartel has. It may because he has been sovereign in his field, consistent for YEARS, trendy and abnormally creative but, his willpower is impressive. He could influence anyone to do anything. He could talk about how much he loves a certain flower, and everyone would buy and love the flower as well. He could laugh a certain way and then everyone would want to laugh like him as well. It’s impressive I tell you.


How has social media helped your career?  Social media has helped me in every way possible. My career is social media! Social media connects me to brands, people from all around the world, educate me, assisted with being my own boss, live anywhere in this world and increased my income! I could go on forever.
What advice would you give others trying to make a name for themselves? No matter what field you are in and what you love, consistency will help you to grow and be successful! Consistency brings results! In addition with branding. Branding yourself through photo, video or audio creates trust and legitimacy with others. Be consistent with your branding and people will follow and share. These two things will help to make a name for yourself and for you to be sovereign in the field you are in. Oh, and everything takes time, your patience will be a reward!
What is the last thing you liked on social media? A Jamaica travel photo ️
Who is your hero? I don’t have one. Well, I would think all my heros are my black activists around this world who had fought and continue to fight for black rights.
How did you get into YouTube? I got into YouTube a few years ago after noticing people could profit from their passions. It inspired me to do the same!
Where do you see your career going in the next few years? I see my brand growing, evolving and being successful.
What inspires you to create? Life. things that happen in everyday life, people and scenery. The things I do on a daily inspire me to come up with helpful YouTube videos. The stories my friends, family and I share amongst each other and the daily life experiences learnt helps me to create content to share on YouTube! For photos, my inspiration is scenery. While I’m driving or walking, I’m always looking at the scenery around me. I get inspired by seeing ‘pretty’ scenery which then inspires me to plan a photoshoot there. Also, I get inspiration from other people on YouTube and Instagram, seeing other people’s consistency, creative and beautiful work continues to drive me to consistently work smart, learn more about the fields I’m in and grow!

“I really admire the influence Vybz Kartel has. It may because he has been sovereign in his field, consistent for YEARS, trendy and abnormally creative but, his willpower is impressive. He could influence anyone to do anything.”

Ever since she could remember, Jamaica has held an important part of her life. Being introduced to such a distinct, vibrant, creative and confident culture and people, made her fall in love, and she never looked elsewhere. Being Jamaican is definitely an experience she would not change for the world. She considers Jamaica, the land of wood, water and wellness because of the calming spaces like the countryside and the beach.

Originally from Scarborough, Ontario, Canada, born September 9th, 1996, Annesha comes from a big family of seven sisters and one brother all from the same parents. She was first introduced to the island by her proud Jamaican parents who raised her, authentic Jamaican cuisine, non-stop dancehall and reggae music playing and vibes! Although, she is Jamaican through descent, being a part of the culture has been one thing she grew up being aware of. She now lives and resides in Mandeville and makes a living as a YouTuber, vlogging about everything from the best places to visit to how-tos and hair tutorials.

Annesha was nominated as one of Bashy’s YouTubers to watch in 2020.

Girl Boss Sue-Tanya McHorgh: From losing her job to Online Entrepreneur

Sue-Tanya hopes to inspire her generation to build their own online businesses. Photo Credit: Rockstaar

What is your dream job? 

To launch my Creatives of the Future e-book, (to purchase, click here) I interviewed some creatives who were already monetizing their platforms because of their work on social media. One of those people is website Designer and Blogger, Sue-Tanya Mchorgh.

  1. What is your dream job? My current job is my dream job. The ability to create and earn from something I am passionate about is a dream come true for me . A lot of people are unhappy in their jobs. Not me. I love my job. 

2. What Netflix series are you binging on? Blacklist

3. Favourite Influencer/YouTuber of all time? @Jadedarmawngsa

4. How has social media helped your career? My social media has helped me with advertising and getting targeted leads for my businesses.

5. What advice would you give others trying to make a name for themselves? Stay focused, have a game plan, a small circle of friends, get a mentor and follow your gut.  

6.What is the last thing you liked on social media? Cat videos. I am obsessed with them.

7. Who is your hero?  My mom. She did an amazing job raising me.

8. How did you get into blogging?  I started blogging because I wanted an outlet to share my travel and entrepreneurial experiences. 

9. Where do you see your career going in the next few years? I hope to perfect my current offerings, expand my businesses, hire employees and venture into coaching small business owners. 

10.What inspires you to create? My customers and my competitors. I love seeing my customers happy. They encourage me to create and improve on my skills. So does the competition. 

By the age of 17, Sue-Tanya Mchorgh knew she wanted to become an entrepreneur. She decided to study Business Administration but due to financial restraints, had to get a job and work overtime to pay tuition.

Juggling a 9-5 while going to school was hard work. Then she got laid off and didn’t have money to finish her studies. Thankfully, she was introduced to the world of working online as a virtual assistant and web designer. A virtual assistant, by definition, is an independent contractor who provides administrative services to clients while operating outside of the client’s office.

Today, she remotely helps clients with everything from social media, story and article writing, video editing, branding, and web design all from her home office.

Since she started in 2017, her client list has grown to include government institutions, realtors and even personal brands. She also owns an online fashion boutique called Suety’s Boutique where she sells her favorite fast-fashion finds.

Sue-Tanya modeled with Those Creative People for the launch of their Color Collection

Sue-Tanya considers herself a girl boss, which is basically a confident, capable woman who pursues her own ambitions instead of settling in life and hopes to inspire her generation through her motivational Instagram account @motivatedbysue.

Today, she’s also been able to live life on her terms by monetizing her social media platforms and carving out a niche as a content creator and blogger. On her website, www.suetanyamchorgh, she shares her opinion about everything from business to fashion. She’s worked with brands like Those Creative People, Kingston Creative, Jamaica Observer’s Take Style Out  and the Ministry of Gender, Culture, Entertainment and Sport highlighting the 2020 Reggae Month activities.

She wants to help entrepreneurs and small businesses create their e-commerce sites, branding kits and social media content. She also teaches others how to become a virtual assistant.

Girl Boss Sue-Tanya is a web designer, brand specialist, and lifestyle blogger. She’s worked with brands like CPJ, Kingston Industrial Garage, Ministry of Culture, Gender, Entertainment and Sport, Those Creative People and others. You can learn about Sue-Tanya at www.suetanyamchorgh.com

Guest Blog: Kevin Jackson: Advice for Filmmakers During Quarantine

Jamaica has taken a blow from the COVID-19 pandemic sweeping the globe. Education, Farming, Fitness, Financial, Food, Manufacturing. You name it, they have taken a hit. Disney recently furloughed 43,000 employees from their theme parks alone in the United States. Geez, can you imagine 43,000 people who got paid to entertain kids, now have to go home to entertain their kids 24/7 and not get paid for it. Yikes Talk about irony.

In Jamaica some people are already being sent home without pay. In the local film arena Palace Amusement, the cinema monopoly in Jamaica has closed their doors till further notice. No more of those succulent salty hot dogs and buttery popcorn. Well, I have Act II Popcorn in my cupboard, so I don’t miss that as much, but those hot dogs though. Sigh, I digress. 

Sadly, at a time when Filmmaking is experiencing a renaissance in Jamaica, Video Production crews are forced to stay home. A literal production hell nightmare.

JAFTA Propella

Award-winning Film Director Kia Moses being interviewed about her short film, “Flight.”

One programme that has been pushing the barrier with film is the JAFTA Propella script to screen initiative of the Jamaica Film and Television Association. In case you haven’t heard of it, it’s a great way for filmmakers experienced and inexperienced to get a “Buss”. The word “Propella” is just Patois (Patwa) for Propeller, meaning to move forward.

Every year around November they have an open call for submissions of film treatments (Basically a synopsis of your story…NOT A SCRIPT), a blind judging process shortlists 10 projects during its first round. After submissions of a draft script and other items, 4 – 5 projects are selected and are awarded (subject to certain conditions of course), a partial production funding grant, and each project’s above-the-line participants take part in developmental workshops, towards creating a short film. In case you don’t know what “above-the-line” means, it’s Hollywood talk for the people in charge like the producers, director and writer.

This programme started in 2016 and to date has yielded 14 short films which have premiered in Trinidad, France, South Africa, Atlanta, Guadeloupe, Germany, Florida and a bag of other places. Combined the projects have raked in over 20 international awards like the Black Women’s Film Network, International Du Pan African De Cannes, Nouveaux Regards Film Festival, GATFFEST Film Festival, Bentonville Film festival and we’d be here all day if I listed anymore. 

One of the films, “Flight” written by Kia Moses and directed by Kia Moses and Adrian McDonald aired on HBO Zone On February 3rd of this year. “Origins” by Kurt Wright received local funding to create a 60 minute slot pilot episode. “Mango Wars” by Kyle Chin and “This City of Mine” by Danielle Russell both signed distribution agreements with “Kweli TV” an African Diaspora Video On Demand platform regarded as the Afro-Descendant Netflix or Black Netflix if you want to straddle the lines of political correctness.

This year’s JAFTA Propella submissions closed the end of February just before COVID-19 hit Jamaica and concerns grew as to whether the programme would be postponed or even cancelled. Thankfully that is not the case. Had a chat with JAFTA President Analisa Chapman and she said there is no cancellation. The productions may be delayed however the steps that take place before production starts will be conducted virtually. In fact, the virtual ball has already started rolling. 

 

Normally the announcement of the first-round top 10 shortlist is announced face to face at JAFTA monthly meetings but this year we did it via Instagram Live which saw up to 80 people tuning in to see who made the cut.  The first Script Consultation session has already happened online, and participants are currently preparing for the second-round interviews and final judging for the final four projects, workshops, script consultations and more will be done virtually.

The hope is that by the time all the steps leading up to production are completed, the restrictions on movement and gathering in public will be lifted. If not, the productions will simply have to wait until the situation clears up.

Even if we (Jamaica) did have the luxury of filming during this time, practically all the film festivals JAFTA Propella would target have postponed their events. There is no rush to meet any external deadlines. Yes, this delays this year’s delivery of films and exposure of emerging talent, but it also gives the participants more time to polish up the quality of their final film. Thorough preparation almost always produces better results. That and a good team behind you.

What’s Next?

In the meantime, I strongly encourage filmmakers to make use of the down time. Learn new skills. Collaborate online and find innovative ways to use technology and the internet to your advantage. Writers can still write. Producers can still prepare contracts, shot list and call sheets. Assistant Directors and Location scouts can still search for locations virtually in many cases and actors/actresses can rehearse online.  

The show must go on, even if COVID-19 doesn’t go away. We must be prepared when that reality is before us.

Kevin Jackson is a writer, filmmaker and animator. He teaches Script Writing and Animation at the University of the West Indies, the HEART Vocational Training Development Institute and Northern Caribbean University. He currently serves as the outgoing President for the Jamaica Animation Nation Network and out going Marketing and Communications director for the Jamaica Film and Television Association. Oh, he is also the Vice President of the Jamaica Fencing Federation. No not chain link fence. Sword fencing. Yeah…that. Follow him @nivekproanimations

Working From Home? My Budget-Friendly Dream Home Office

Featured

Ok, so you’ve probably gotten used to working from home but now you need to get settled. In order to work most efficiently you need a room of your own away from the hustle and bustle of family life. It’s also much easier to achieve a good work/life balance if you can shut the door on the place where you run your business.

Try to identify an underused room where you’ll be able to focus. This doesn’t need to be a huge space, but comfortable enough for you to work in. Perhaps a spare bedroom or even the garage – with ventilation of course. Here is my dream list of things I want for my home office space.

1. I’m into 20th century modern art, so I want this abstract black and white piece to compliment the pink tones. It reminds me of Robert Motherwell.

You can purchase this piece here

2. This dalmation polka-dot wall decal has me swooning. I love a good black and white accent wall.

3. Who doesn’t love white pineapples to give us that tropical feel, even though we’re inside?

Get these cute pineapples here

4. Must have: Super cute polka-dot coffee mug from Kate Spade to match my accent wall.

Get this cute thermal mug here

4. Then to monitor my water intake (gotta stay hydrated in these times) I have this cool water bottle!

Keep hydrated with this water bottle. Get it here

5. Even through I’m all about digitizing my life, I couldn’t help but covet these pink “I’m very busy” folders from bando.

This would be a great addition to your home office. Get it here

6. Don’t worry, the other side says, “Let’s Stay In.”

This is such a cool sign. Get it here

The COVID-19 Playlist: Reggae and Dancehall Songs for the apocalypse

Featured

With folks self-quarantining and social-distancing — and all live music entertainment shut down — I’m putting together a stay-at-home soundtrack for the viral apocalypse until Protoje and the crew buss a livestream on us.

Turn your room into a dance with the sleek and portable design of this Marley Bluetooth speaker. Purchase here

Serious times: Gyptian

Untold Stories: Buju Banton

Justice: Sevana

Guide Over us: Sizzla Kalonji

Any Weather: Vybz Kartel

W: Koffee

Hol a Fresh: Red Dragon

Popcaan: Firm and Strong

Listen to your playlist with Beats by Dre Classic Black Headphones. Purchase here

I Can: Chronixx

Fresh & Clean: Jazz Elise

Babylon: Jane MacGizmo

Feeling Chronixxx? Buy a tee

Disclosure: Please note that some of the links above may be affiliate links, and at no additional cost to you, I earn a commission if you make a purchase. I recommend only products and companies I trust and the income goes to keeping the site up and running.

7 Jamaican-Made Things You’ll Want on Hand If You Have to Work From Home.

Featured

I’ve been working from home for at least 3 months now since I launched my agency, The Storyteller in January. As someone who is used to being at home most of the day, in all honesty the past few days have been difficult.

Being self-quarantined has forced me to enjoy myself more. Here are some things you need to keep on hand now you’re spending more time at home.

1. THE LABEL SNOB water bottle

During the Corona Pandemic, it makes sense to keep hydrated to boost your immune system. These super cute tumblers will save you some trips to the fridge.

Customize tumblers for every member of your family, so that no one has to fight over who gets to use the good cup! You can also keep hot or cold beverages.

2. HERBOO BOTANICALS face & body oil

If you’re practicing good hygiene but your hands are getting dry from all of the 20-second-hand-washing, use Herboo Botanicals mixed with some shea butter to help soothe your dry skin.

Herboo Face & Body oil is made with an amazing blend of coconut oil, jojoba oil and sage essential oil. This unique mixture also allows you to also remove makeup and reduce stretch marks.  Use my code, “KESI” at checkout for a discount.

3. Those Creative People’s 2020 PLANNA

I know we’re used to using those productivity apps, but writing things down improves memory. Being able to fill in the dates yourself gives you the freedom to use your planna at any point in the year, without wasting pages.

A 2020 planner from TCPtings.com helps you stay organized. Use my promo code “LNL-KESI-5” at checkout to get a 10% discount. It also helps you track things like your fitness, water intake and even moods.

4. MICA candle

Burning candles helps to reduce anxiety and lower levels of depression or stress. Using the principles of aromatherapy, scented candles can create the ideal mood and ambience for your home.

Burn this soy candle to help calm your nerves, so you can focus. Soy is better for your health: Soy burns cleaner and produces as much as 90 percent less soot than paraffin, reducing the amount of indoor air pollution produced.

5.Live Juice Bar food delivery service

Plant-based foods are better for you and the environment, besides it comes with a green juice for breakfast and natural juice for lunch. You also get your food delivered two days in advance, so this also saves on delivery costs.

6. JahMah Live Stream

Keep motivated throughout the day with JahMah livestream and play the your favourite hits. They even have playlists based on your mood.

7. One Love Duvet Cover for Naptime

Get ready for naptime and buy it here

You might want to take nap time around 3 p.m-ish. Don’t worry, we gotchu!

What are your essentials now that you’re working from home?

Disclosure: Please note that some of the links above may be affiliate links, and at no additional cost to you, I earn a commission if you make a purchase. I recommend only products and companies I trust and the income goes to keeping the site up and running.

Beat Street & Dennis Brown Tribute Concert : The Death of Vinyl and the Evolution of Reggae Music

Featured

I took the shuttle from Spanish Court Hotel down to Orange Street, Downtown Kingston, otherwise known as “Beat Street” which runs north from the corner of Parade, last Sunday, February 23rd for one of Kingston Creative’s activities in partnership with Ministry of Culture, Gender, Entertainment & Sports, the Kingston and  St Andrew Municipal Corporation to commemorate Reggae Month.

According to Lonely Planet.com “It’s one of the great wellsprings of Jamaican music and was home to Sir Coxsone Dodd’s legendary Studio One Records, as well as the original studios of Lee ‘Scratch’ Perry and Prince Buster’s famous Record Shack.”

Feeling nostalgic? Get this tee here

From 1950s to early 70s, ska, rocksteady, reggae, and dub exploded and became a worldwide phenomenon. Record shops and studios monopolized the street and surrounding areas. Beat Street has become an important historical zone that deserves to be preserved and redeveloped as a reggae historical and economic zone. 

We walked along the street and it reminded me of my days of living in New York, where they’d have the street festivals with art, food and music. Vendors were selling roast corn, chicken soup, ital stew,  roots tonic and beer while murals lined both sides.

The music filled the streets as sound systems, Soultone and Shanghai, played music of the three producers, Clement “Coxson” Dodd, Cecil “Prince Buster” Campbell, and Lee “Scratch” Perry and that of Dennis Brown, who lived at “Big Yard” located at 135 Orange Street. 

This one yah name “inside the Rockers International”

 As we walked, I met Clive Randy Chin, who sat on the corner with a friend. He told me that his father’s studio  and record shop called Randy’s Group on North Parade was being honored as a musical heritage site.

Clive Randy Chin on Beat Street last Sunday celebrating his Dad’s shop being honored as a musical heritage site
at North Parade

He told me that Ken Boothe, Alton Ellis, Toots and The Maytals,  Dennis Brown, Lord Fraser and even the Peptones all recorded at his father’s studio on North Parade.

Most record shops haven’t survived the death of vinyl or cds for that matter but he made it clear that he’s still producing music but without the overheads—in his home studio.

The Death of Vinyl

So vinyl records ruled that era but as the years went on analog audio recordings degraded the quality of the music as vinyl records and cassette tapes don’t age very well. Did you ever notice when you played a cassette tape over and over again, it affected the sound quality?  If you like to collect vinyl records, here’s a classic by the Crown Prince of Reggae, Dennis Brown, shop here

Nowadays, digital audio recordings are consistently the same sound quality because you can play and copy them endlessly, and they will maintain their original quality forever—unless you manipulate the file, of course.

 I had no prior knowledge of Beat Street or its connection to cultivating reggae and dancehall music until I walked into Trevor “Leggo” Douglas’s recording studio, aka LeggoBeast.

His close relative named, “Q”, sat at the sound machines and answered questions about the history of the studio, how it came to be and where it’s going.

We asked, who had recorded there, to which Q answered, “The better question to ask is, who hasn’t?”

Murals lined the walls of Beat Street. From Sean Paul to Big Youth, Beat Street has seen them all.

Trevor “Leggo” Douglas explained, that every great reggae artist had recorded there from Shaggy to Dennis Brown, with the exception of Bob Marley.

Leggo explained his journey to becoming the owner of the studio, from collecting bottles at dances at 13 to make pocket change, to making cassettes and then migrating to New York to run a robot taxi in order to make enough money to buy the studio equipment and ship them back home.

He then  took us to “Big Yard”, the official childhood home of Dennis Brown. In ruin, however around the back was a small room where people who knew him well lived. Dennis Brown was known for taking care of everyone in the community. They are trying to raise money to make it a museum.

Rockers International is the only surviving vinyl record shop in Jamaica.
Feel like listening to some classics? Purchase Marley Get Together Portable Bluetooth Speaker here

We then walked into Rockers International which is the only surviving vinyl record shop in Jamaica. It reminded me of the shops they used to have in HWT, that my brother used to visit on his trips home from Denmark. He would buy the latest records for his sounds system he and his friends ran.

We finished the day at Randy’s Music Group on North Parade where Randy showed all the old equipment that was gathering dust. Old posters decorated the walls and I found a Magnum Tonic Wine calendar from 2015, I had conceptualized with dancehall artist Stacious posing as an Amazonian woman with a bike man underneath, staring up at her.

Dennis Brown Tribute Concert

I headed back downtown in the evening at the Waterfront where Kristia aka @myrepeatoffender was doing an IG takeover on Reggae Month’s page.

Purchase a memorabilia Dennis Brown T-shirt here

Freddie McGregor, Julian Marley, Richie Stephens and so many other amazing artists came down to tribute Dennis Brown’s birthday.

What a great way to end Reggae Month. Can’t wait until next year!

My 1st Podcast Interview EVER! With Latoya Wakefield of Tallawah Podcast.

Featured

I’m brutally honest in my first podcast about my struggles as a single parent, my depression, working in a male-dominant industry and the sacrifices I’ve had to make to get ahead. I’m grateful to no longer have to ask for permission to be who I am.

Listen to my one-hour interview as I talk about the journey of founding Love Not Likes and The Storyteller Agency. Co.

EPISODE HIGHLIGHTS
• I share why I believe Jamaica is ten years behind digitally.
• “I’ve always said I want to be paid to be myself.” As a creative, through my agency, I am able to focus on creating opportunities through visibility and attraction marketing.
• The Storyteller Agency Co. aims to create a buzz online, typically for the less mainstream events. Their focus is to create experiential experiences to up-level interest and exposure within the digital space.
• “For me achievement is being recognized in my community.”
• I talk about my struggle with depression intermittently throughout her journey, my credit to therapy, meditation and consistently practicing gratitude as essential in keeping grounded.
• About success and finding your own path, I state, “You need to find the empty spaces in the market that are not being utilized and that, of course, depends on your interest and what your niche is.”

Me with some of the Love Not Likes Blogger community at the launch of Caribbean Dreams fusion media launch

Listen www.anchor.fm/tallawah-podcast .

7th Annual Jamaica Music Conference: Traditional vs. New Media

Featured
Photo Credit: William Richards

I was invited to be a panelist at the 7th Annual Jamaica Music Conference to discuss the social and Emerging Media for the future of reggae and dancehall music. I was invited because we are currently running an influencer campaign for the Ministry of Culture, Gender, Entertainment and Sport’s Reggae Month’s activities, highlighting some of the great cultural activities and special events on the schedule.

The panelists were on the new media side: Ari Hammond and Naro Hart, Hosts, of The Fix Podcast on YouTube and representatives of traditional media: Ellen Khoelings and Pete Lilly from the popular German-based reggae magazine, Riddim Magazine. And me, the Founder of Love Not Likes, a blogger/influencer network. Although Love Not Likes is fairly new, I’ve been working in marketing and communications for over a decade and so I’m familiar with both mediums.

Photo Credit: William Richards

It was a great opportunity for me to show that they are also different kinds of non-traditional media platforms like CaribVoxx, KingstonCityLife, Haute People and LuxuryJa, dedicated to creating great local content that can also connect with the Diaspora.

Watch part of the discussion on OnStage’s YouTube channel.

Correction: YouTube is number two, not number the number one social media channel.

ABOUT JAMAICA MUSIC CONFERENCE

This is a sponsored post by The Ministry of Culture, Gender, Entertainment and Sport for Reggae Month. All reviews and opinions expressed in this post are based on my personal view.


Jamaica Music Conference is the preeminent music conference that connects music artists, creatives, and entrepreneurs globally with the who’s who in the Jamaica music industry. Now in its 7th staging, the JMC provides an opportunity for independent music professionals to network and collaborate with industry peers, seasoned professionals and creatives, showcase emerging talent,and learn best practices and gain insights into the ever-changing business of music, through relevant panel discussions and interactive workshops.

How to Be an Influencer/Blogger

Featured
Fashion and beauty are popular industries to capitalize on

On Valentine’s Day, February 14th, I was specially invited by the Ministry of Education, Heart/ NTA and Kingston Creative to present on the career paths of a social media influencer and blogger to a group of children from ages 11-17 year olds, grades 7 to nine at the Creative and Cultural Expo at the Institute of Jamaica. Children from as far as St. Elizabeth came for the presentation, and it was a pleasure to have a discussion about the career paths in the digital space. The entire day was dedicated to to Creative Economy Careers! Podcasting, game development and animation were the other career paths presented and it was insightful to see how each presenter received feedback from the audience.

Every speaking engagement I do, I always tailor the presentation to the audience. (You can download the link below) These were young, bright students from all over the island, including as far as St. Elizabeth. They were responsive and eager to hear the different options available to them. I explained that their interests don’t have to be narrowed to comedy, fashion and beauty like most of the popular influencers. They can be influencers in finance, culinary arts, the environment, the topics are endless. I also wanted to make sure they understood the dangers of being a minor online and that they need their parent’s permission before they start.

With mobile penetration growing at the rate it is, it’s great to see that the government is looking to empower the next generation on the future of work, which is Digital.

Digital Transformation is something I’m passionate about and I feel that young people need to see what the world has to offer. More than 4.5 billion people use the internet globally and as of January 2019 in Hootsuite ‘s latest report, 1. 20 million of those are in Jamaica. I spoke about how I built my website in a day even though I failed HTML coding in college. 🤔 Now, why don’t you have a blog yet?

ABOUT KINGSTON CREATIVE

This post is brought to you by Love Not Likes partnership with Kingston Creative. All reviews and opinions expressed in this post are based on my personal view.

Kingston Creative is a registered nonprofit organisation that believes that Kingston is the Creative Capital of the Caribbean. More information can be found at www.kingstoncreative.org.  The NGO is developing an Art District and Creative Hub in Downtown Kingston, Jamaica in partnership with the following “First 50” Sponsors.